Interacting with the cluster using kubectl.

Category : Kubernetes | Sub Category : Learn Kubernetes | By Prasad Bonam Last updated: 2023-11-22 07:30:58 Viewed : 417


Interacting with a Kubernetes cluster using kubectl involves various commands to manage resources, inspect the cluster state, and troubleshoot issues. Here is a guide to some common kubectl commands:

1. Basic Commands:

  • Get Resources:

    • List all resources of a specific type:
      bash
      kubectl get pods kubectl get services
    • Get detailed information about a resource:
      bash
      kubectl get pods <pod-name> -o yaml
  • Create and Apply:

    • Create or apply a resource from a YAML file:
      bash
      kubectl apply -f my-pod.yaml
  • Delete Resource:

    • Delete a resource by name or from a YAML file:
      bash
      kubectl delete pod <pod-name> kubectl delete -f my-pod.yaml

2. Inspecting Cluster:

  • Cluster Info:

    • Display the cluster information:
      bash
      kubectl cluster-info
  • Node Info:

    • Get information about nodes in the cluster:
      bash
      kubectl get nodes
  • Describe:

    • Describe a resource for detailed information:
      bash
      kubectl describe pod <pod-name> kubectl describe node <node-name>

3. Working with Pods:

  • Logs:

    • View the logs of a pod:
      bash
      kubectl logs <pod-name>
  • Exec into Pod:

    • Run commands inside a pod:
      bash
      kubectl exec -it <pod-name> -- /bin/bash
  • Port Forwarding:

    • Forward a local port to a port on a pod:
      bash
      kubectl port-forward <pod-name> 8080:80

4. Managing Deployments:

  • Deployments:

    • List and manage deployments:
      bash
      kubectl get deployments kubectl scale deployment <deployment-name> --replicas=3
  • Rolling Update:

    • Perform a rolling update of a deployment:
      bash
      kubectl set image deployment/<deployment-name> nginx=nginx:1.17 --record

5. Services:

  • Services:

    • List and manage services:
      bash
      kubectl get services
  • Expose Deployment:

    • Expose a deployment as a service:
      bash
      kubectl expose deployment <deployment-name> --type=NodePort --port=8080

6. Namespaces:

  • Create and Switch Namespace:

    • Create a new namespace and switch to it:
      bash
      kubectl create namespace my-namespace kubectl config set-context --current --namespace=my-namespace
  • List Resources in Namespace:

    • List resources in a specific namespace:
      bash
      kubectl get pods --namespace=my-namespace

7. Troubleshooting:

  • Events:

    • View events related to resources:
      bash
      kubectl get events
  • Describe Resource for Troubleshooting:

    • Describe a resource to troubleshoot issues:
      bash
      kubectl describe pod <pod-name>
  • Logs and Exec for Troubleshooting:

    • Check logs and exec into a pod to troubleshoot issues:
      bash
      kubectl logs <pod-name> kubectl exec -it <pod-name> -- /bin/bash

These are just a few examples of the numerous kubectl commands available. The command-line tool is powerful and flexible, allowing you to manage and interact with your Kubernetes cluster efficiently. You can explore more commands and options in the kubectl documentation.

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